Title: CLASSIC CATHOLIC AUDIOBOOKS: ANCIENT EUCHARISTIC MIRACLES, FULL CATHOLIC AUDIOBOOK (AUDIO ONLY)
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CLASSIC CATHOLIC AUDIOBOOKS: ANCIENT EUCHARISTIC MIRACLES, FULL CATHOLIC AUDIOBOOK (AUDIO ONLY) Ancient Eucharistic Miracles: A Collection of Stories of the Various Miracle of the Blessed Sacrament has Locked From the Early Church Up Until the Medieval Period By Saint Eudoxia, (SP) Martyr, - Catholic Audiobook The Catholic Church teaches that once consecrated in the Eucharist, the elements cease to be bread and wine and become the "Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity" of Christ, "whole and entire" indeed under the species of bread, and of wine, via a conversion called transubstantiation.[49] Each of which is accompanied by the other and by Christ's soul and divinity,[50] as long as the Eucharistic species subsist,[51] that is, until the Eucharist is digested, physically destroyed, or decays by some natural process[52] (at which point Aquinas argued that the substance of the bread and wine cannot return).[53] The empirical appearance and physical properties (called the species or accidents) are not changed, but in the view of Catholics, the reality (called the substance) indeed is; hence the term transubstantiation to describe the phenomenon. The consecration of the bread (known as the Host) and wine represents the separation of Jesus' Body from his Blood at Calvary. However, since he has risen, the Church teaches that his Body and Blood can no longer be truly separated. Where one is, the other must be. Therefore, although the priest (or extraordinary minister of Holy Communion) says "The Body of Christ" when administering the Host and "The Blood of Christ" when presenting the chalice, the communicant who receives either one receives Christ, whole and entire. The Catholic Church sees as the main basis for this belief the words of Jesus himself at his Last Supper: the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew 26:26-28; Mark 14:22-24; Luke 22:19-20) and Saint Paul's 1 Cor. 11:23-25) recount that in that context Jesus said of what to all appearances were bread and wine: "This is my body … this is my blood." The Catholic understanding of these words, from the Patristic authors onward, has emphasized their roots in the covenantal history of the Old Testament. The interpretation of Christ's words against this Old Testament background coheres with and supports belief in the Real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. In 1551, the Council of Trent definitively declared, "Because Christ our Redeemer said that it was truly his body that he was offering under the species of bread,[Jn. 6:51] it has always been the conviction of the Church of God, and this holy Council now declares again that by the consecration of the bread and wine there takes place a change of the whole substance of the bread into the substance of the body of Christ our Lord and of the whole substance of the wine into the substance of his blood. This change the holy Catholic Church has fittingly and properly called transubstantiation."[55][56] The Fourth Council of the Lateran in 1215 had spoken of "Jesus Christ, whose body and blood are truly contained in the sacrament of the altar under the forms of bread and wine, the bread being changed (transsubstantiatis) by divine power into the body and the wine into the blood."[note 6] The attempt by some twentieth-century Catholic theologians to present the Eucharistic change as an alteration of significance (transignification rather than transubstantiation) was rejected by Pope Paul VI in his 1965 encyclical letter Mysterium fidei. In his 1968 Credo of the People of God, he reiterated that any theological explanation of the doctrine must hold to the twofold claim that, after the consecration, 1) Christ's body and blood are really present; and 2) bread and wine are really absent; and this presence and absence is real and not merely something in the mind of the believer. On entering a church, Latin Church Catholics genuflect to the tabernacle that holds the consecrated host in order to respectfully acknowledge the presence of Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament, a presence signalled by a sanctuary lamp or votive candle kept burning close to such a tabernacle. (If there is no such burning light, it indicates that the tabernacle is empty of the special presence of Jesus in the Eucharist.) Catholics will also often kneel or sit before the tabernacle, when the sanctuary light is lit, to pray directly to Jesus, materially present in the form of the Eucharist. Similarly, the consecrated Eucharistic host—the unleavened bread—is sometimes exposed on the altar, usually in an ornamental fixture called a Monstrance, so that Catholics may pray or contemplate in the direct presence and in direct view of Jesus in the Eucharist; this is sometimes called "exposition of the Blessed Sacrament", and the prayer and contemplation in front of the exposed Eucharist are often called "adoration of the Blessed Sacrament" or just "adoration". All of these practices stem from belief in the Real Presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist, which is an essential Article of Faith of the Catholic Church. Published on Nov 28, 2017. 01:08:46 minutes. Themes: Classic Catholic Audiobooks series; Eucharistic Miracles (Ancient) Excerpts from: “Ancient Eucharistic Miracles: A Collection of Stories of the Various Miracle of the Blessed Sacrament has Locked From the Early Church Up Until the Medieval Period” By Saint Eudoxia, (SP) Martyr; Author: Saint Eudoxia, (SP) Martyr. Excerpts From “Ancient Eucharistic Miracles: A Collection of Stories of the Various Miracle of the Blessed Sacrament has Locked From the Early Church Up Until the Medieval Period”
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